About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 11
MSNBC 3
CSPAN 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads to conflict. let's get some conversation from those of you who are thinking sisley that this is supposed to be a no-nonsense forum on military and secret strategy. i don't want you to predict war, bu
get everywhere because of the laws. and i know clint eastwood doesn't like these laws but tough. then you get to -- they want to extend it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought
if law enforcement agencies can persuade congress to act. there are new developments and brian todd is joining us now. what's going on here, brian? >> wolf, law enforcement now wants to be able to retrieve our text messages. not just the so-called meta data, the who and when, they want the context and carriers to store it for three months. as one prosecutor pointed out to us, these days your text is often where the evidence is. michelle says she started getting the harassing texts in early november. an anonymous person threatened to send nude pictures of her to her mother and then to a wide circulation. one text said i'm so close to sending them to everyone. you are so sexy, you'll be an online star in no time unless you answer me. the threats came from different cell phone numbers. a model and college student, she was terrified. >> i was very, very afraid. i mean, that week i didn't go to a night class because i didn't feel safe to walk by myself. >> reporter: it's tho kinds of texts that u.s. law enforcement authorities want more power to investigate. several law enforcement group
the gramm-rudman deficit law, which was so important at the time. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician, and he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. [laughter] we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second. fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good, he had the courage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate with talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he also expressed his hope for the future of the senate, saying it is a very special place with very special people. i hope in the coming years that the inst
for ratification of a united nations treaty on the rights of the disabled, which was modeled on a law passed by the senate. 22 years ago, the americans with disabilities act. in effect, it was a vote to export american law to the 155 nations around the world that have signed this treaty. a treaty that has already been ratified by 126 of those countries, including the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the am
said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make -- there has to be a special mass when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, i do not think they want to ask bair. wright, ith crystal righ sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> they both -- politicians from both sides said they would be able to avoid the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloo
based on what has been american law since the first bush presidency 22 years ago. the treaty supported by every democrat and eight republicans, came five votes short of passage of the required 66 needed for ratification. 38 republicans voted no despite the return to the floor of former majority leader bob dole only days out of the hospital. there at the age of 89 to rally support from his former friends including orrin hatch, cluck grassley, mitch mcconnell and thad cochran but they voted it down. the floor manager john kerry called it one of the saddest days in his nearly 28 days in the senate which he says is broken and dysfunctional. the chairman of the foreign relations committee john kerry joins me now. thank you very much. you spoke of this passionately yesterday and you've had an overnight to think about this, but the moment was clearly so compelling watching bob dole on the floor, wheeled in by his wife, the former senator elizabeth dole and you and john mccain and other war veterans calling for passage of this, it tell me your thoughts today? >> my first thought, andrea, hate
benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. so now's the time. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> we should not be sitting around twiddling our thumbs. the clock is running. we face a fiscal cliff. there are some in this chamber who have said, oh, we need to go off of it. we'll go off of it. we'll pay the price and then we'll finally sit down and do what's right. i would, with all due respect, say that's pretty stupid. >> that was some blunt talk from my next guest, republican senator from georgia, johnny isaacson. that was two and a half weeks ago. the more things change, the more th
political events yesterday was the president signing into law the mark twain co-membmmemorati act. they'll be sold with a surcharge to help respect research and education to honor the great man of letters. but there was another political event yesterday on the floor of the senate. that was the absolute reverse of this noble act of veneration. in the presence of a wheelchair-bound war hero, 89-year-old former senator bob dole, members gathered, hoping to ratify a united nations treaty that's based entirely on the americans with disabilities act. it would ensure that people with disabilities are granted the same general rights as anyone else. and it's a treaty that anyone with a modicom of sense and civic fairness would find impossible to oppose, as senator john kerry explained. >> bob dole, why is he here? he's not here because he's here to advocate for the united nations. he is here because he wants to know that other countries will come to treat the disabled the way we do. >> yet incredibly, republican[ç refused to support the treaty. the measure, which required a two-thirds majority
to tell us what to do. neither are true. there is no requirement in this treaty whatsoever that any law in the united states would be changed, no new right would be created that doesn't exist already in the united states and most importantly because of the terminology of the treaty, the treaty language, that it's not self-executing, that means nobody has recourse in any court in the united states of america to enforce the treaty. you might ask, why sign up to the treaty, then? the reason is this treaty is based on the gold standard of how america treats people with disabilities. it's based on americans with disabilities act and raises other countries to our standard. it's really exporting american sovereignty to other nations. it's exporting our values. and most importantly, it makes a real difference in the lives of people with disabilities, you know, born with a disability or something happens to them in life and they have one or veterans, for instance, who want to travel abroad, work abroad, study abroad, you know, just visit. this would have raised their quality of life and these se
aspect, andrea, the british government changed the law just this year in preparation for this, a lieu that would have been in these modern times considered sexist which said that only a baby boy could be in line for the throne. whether or not this baby is a girl or a boy, she or he will be in line for the throne, third in line for the throne after charles, after william. so it's a very important moment coming up for the country, of course, because not only is it a new member of the royal family, not only a baby for this most glamorous of international couples, but as well as that, we are seeing a potentially the birth of the future king or queen. it comes after all of that speculation, andrea, they're on tour and people said why is kate not drinking alcohol, champagne, that kind of thing, drinking water, why -- and when prince william was given a baby toy just last week he said, i'll keep that. leading people to speculate maybe kate was pregnant. now we know she is. >> all exciting news. we wish her good health and all of the expectation now for what is going to follow. we hope the pa
and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as they describe it would encourage the world to live up to the same standard that the u.s. has had these p
to the disabled to public buildings. when george bush signed it into law, it made you proud whether you were a democrat or republican, a politician or one of the rest of us. >> this historic act is the world's first comprehensive declaration of equality for people with disabilities. >> schieffer: but that was then and this is now. >> the resolution for ratification is not agreed to. >> schieffer: partisanship runs so deep when an international treaty that callologist other countries to provide the same right to their disabled came to the senate for ratification, conservative republicans blocked it, blocked it despite a dramatic appeal by 89-year-old former republican leader bob dole, himself a disabled world war ii veteran. and even though their usual allies the chamber of commerce and veterans groups wanted it. opponents gave various reasons arguing the treaty might prevent parents from home schooling. it doesn't. i didn't hear many say though, how proud blocking it made them feel. some just seemed embarrassed. has washington changed? maybe i'm wrong but in bob dole's day, i think senators
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)